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Learning Activity 4-C-3 Wiki Instructions


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Clair Judas


My ‘students’ are adults, teachers who teach students in the general education or special education settings; or other educators whose role it is to support those teachers. As a result, my lesson plan will be one to support those teachers/educators in an adult education class.

Accessible Instructional Materials: Fair or Unfair?

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) states that students with print disabilities (those who can’t read standard text, even though they have had appropriate reading instruction and would be able to understand the content if it was presented to them in some other format) must be provided those print materials in an alternative format. Additionally, those students may be provided with software that reads the text to them.

Some educators feel this is as it should be. Others feel this provides those students with an “unfair advantage”. What do you think?

By Wednesday...
  • In your blog, post an argument fully, yet succinctly stating your point of view.
  • Cite and comment on websites, blogs or other sources that support your viewpoint.

By Friday...
  • Reply to the posts of at least two of your classmates, either supporting their point of view or providing a reasoned argument presenting an alternative viewpoint (you should be able to use the websites, blogs or other sources you located earlier to support your argument)

By Sunday..
  • Revisit your original position.
  • Do you still hold to the original conviction, or have you adjusted your point of view?
  • Which arguments, and facts, that you encountered support your final position?

Category
4
3
2
1
Respect for other opinions
All statements and responses were respectful and in appropriate language
Most statements and responses were respectful and in appropriate language
Most statements and responses were respectful and in appropriate language, except for one or more sarcastic remarks.
Statements and responses were consistently not respectful
Use of facts / statistics
Every major point was well supported with several relevant facts, statistics and/or examples.
Every major point was adequately supported with relevant facts, statistics and/or examples.
Every major point was supported with facts, statistics and/or examples, but the relevance of some was questionable.
Every point was not supported
Information
All information presented was clear, accurate and thorough.
Most information presented was clear, accurate and thorough
Most information presented was clear and accurate, but was not usually thorough
Information had several inaccuracies OR was not usually clear.
Rebuttal
All counter arguments were accurate, relevant and strong
Most counter arguments were accurate, relevant and strong.
Most counter arguments were accurate and relevant, but several were weak.
Counter arguments were not accurate and/or relevant.





Kelly Schreckengost


Creating a Classroom Blog: Language Arts


Grades: 3 and 4



STUDENT OBJECTIVES

Students will:

  • Learn about Weblogging by posting and editing comments to a classroom blog created by the language arts teacher
  • Reinforce their reading comprehension by writing a daily post reflecting on the daily assigned reading
  • Increase their writing skills by posting a weekly, one paragraph post about what they liked or disliked about the week’s assigned readings



MATERIALS NEEDED

  • Computer access for each classroom student
  • Assigned weekly readings from the language arts teacher



LESSON PLANS

  • During week one, teach the students the definition of a web blog.
    • “A Weblog is an easily created, easily updateable Web site that allows the author (or authors) to publish instantly to the Internet from any Internet connection.” Richardson, W. (2010). Blogs, Wiki’s Podcasts and Other Powerful Web Tools for Classrooms.
    • Make sure to obtain all parent permissions needed.
      • Teacher Note: Reference Sample Blogging Letter from p. 15 of Blogs, Wiki’s Podcasts and Other Powerful Web Tools for Classrooms www.tinyurl.com/636vh5


  • Show students examples of various classroom blog sites.
  • Pick one classroom Weblog to follow daily. Subscribe to the blog. Set aside time each day to check the blog and discuss new posts with the students.
    • Ask students questions such as “How do I know if a new post has been added?” and “What would I need to do in order to post a comment?” Make sure students are comfortable with the blogging process.
    • Post a comment to the subscribed blog in order to show the entire class how easily content can be added.
  • During week two, create a classroom blog site. (Blogger and Wordpress are free hosting sites.) Make sure all permissions have been returned.
  • Week two and beyond:
    • Introduce students to the classroom blog. Show them how to find the posted daily reading.
    • Have students start posting their daily reflections.
    • Post an example of what you expect a weekly paragraph to look like.
    • Have students start posting their paragraphs at the end of each week.




ASSESSMENT

Students will be graded in the following manner. Award one point for each question.

  • Week two and beyond:
    • Are the students posting a daily reflection? (1 pt.)
    • Does their response accurately reflect what was read? (1 pt.)
    • Has the student posted an end of the week paragraph? (1 pt.)
    • Has the student spell checked and grammatically checked their work? (1 pt.)
    • There are a maximum of 4 points awarded each week.
    • Teacher Notes: Make sure to stay involved and post back to the students. Give positive feedback when appropriate. If it is apparent that a student needs help or is misunderstanding an assignment, go directly to the student and discuss this matter. Do not post online. Give the student a chance to edit and repost their work/thoughts.




Sharing Projects Through Blogging

Marc Vogle

Sharing Projects Through Blogging



Essential Question: How can we use blogs to share our work and comment on the work of others?

Activating Strategy: discuss blogs and their purposes

Teaching Strategy: model how to create a blog or add content to the class blog

upload pictures and descriptions of projects

look at other students’ projects and provide them with effective comments

Summarizing: comment on at least two students’ projects

Assessment: Students will be scored according to the following rubric.

8
Student correctly uploaded picture and gave detailed description of project.
Student commented on at least two students’ projects and provided constructive feedback.
6
Student correctly uploaded picture and gave some description of project.
Student commented on two students’ projects and provided some feedback.
4
Student either correctly uploaded picture and/or gave little description of project.
Student commented on one student’s project and/or gave little feedback.
2
Student did not upload picture and/or provide description of project.
Student commented on one student’s project, but did not provide feedback.





Dawn Frye's Lesson Plan


The Scarlet Letter Blog

Students will identify the major elements of a novel by discussing them in a series of blog posts. Students will compose blog entries that demonstrate analysis of the novel and its elements. Good blog entries will move beyond just a surface discussion of the elements of the novel and will instead discuss the elements in an in-depth manner which will contribute to the class’s discussion.

Post 1: Students will practice posting to the blog and ensure that they are capable of posting from their computers. Students will also practice embedding links to others comments.

Post 2: Setting – What is the location of the novel? In what time does the novel take place? How do these two factors shape the novel? Comment on at least two other students’ posts and provide a link in your comment to an outside source that shares your opinion.

Post 3: Characters – After reading the first 3 chapters, what are the motivations of the main characters? Comment on at least two other students’ posts and provide a link in your comment to an outside source that shares your opinion.

Post 4: Conflict – What is the major conflict in the novel? Are there any minor conflicts? How did the conflicts shape the novel’s events? Comment on at least two other students’ posts and provide a link in your comment to an outside source that shares your opinion.

Each post will be graded using the following rubric.


Beginning
Developing
Proficient
Strong
Overall use of Blogs
Blog entries are few and generally simple discussions of the elements of the novel
Almost all required blog entries and assignments have been completed and are simple discussions of the novel
All required blog entries have been completed and most of the blogs give evidence of a substantial contribution to the discussion of the elements
All required blog entries have been completed and all of the blogs give evidence of a substantial contribution to the discussion of the elements
Intellectual Engagement with Elements of the Novel
Blog entries make no reference to the issues raised in the novel and/or class activities about the novel
Blog entries make some reference to the issues raised in the novel and/or class activities about the novel
Blog entries demonstrate awareness of most of the key issues raised in the novel and class activities
Blog entries demonstrate engagement with the important issues raised in the novel and class activities
Personal Response to Elements of the Novel
Blog entries show no personal response to the elements of the novel
Blog entries convey very little evidence of a personal response to the elements of the novel
Blog entries convey evidence of a personal response to the elements of the novel, and demonstrate that the author is capable of reflecting on learning and society.
Blog entries convey extensive evidence of a personal response to the elements of the novel, and demonstrate the author’s growth through reflection on learning and society.
Mechanics
Blog entries use incorrect grammar and word usage, making it difficult for others to follow. No links are included connecting your thoughts to those of others.
Blog entries demonstrate some evidence of correct spelling, grammar, punctuation, etc. Audience will have little trouble reading your blog. An occasional link is included.
Blog entries show a good command of Standard English. No problems for your audience. Most blog entries include links.
Blog entries show a very good command of Standard English and have some flair and originality. Blog entries may contain multiple links.


Robert Reed

Blog Lesson: How Can Romney Win the Election?


Class: Online American Government Grade 12
Blog Lesson: Understand the Electoral College- How Can Romney Win?
Learning Targets:
  • Students will identify how the Electoral College works.
  • Students will identify how a candidate can win fewer states and still win the election.
  • Students will develop a strategy for Mitt Romney on how he can win the election by winning key Electoral College states.
Lesson Plan:
  1. Have students read the section on the Electoral College in their online course.
  2. Link the following New York Times article on the blog: http://elections.nytimes.com/2012/electoral-map.
Blog Highlights:
  • Instructor gives a brief review of the Electoral College in the blog including history and the development of its importance.
  • Instructor links lesson (lecture) on electoral college from YouTube or TeacherTube on blog or posts a lecture created by the instructor.
  • Blog directions: Students will be asked to look at the current Electoral College map and identify key states and topics that Mitt Romney should concentrate on to win those states (they will have to pick 2 key states). They must post on the blog and link or cite information about what key political points are of concern to voters in those states.
  • They will have to reply to at least two posts from their classmates analyzing that person’s strategy for Romney’s plan to win those states (give feedback).
Purpose of the Blog Lesson:
To get students to think about the following:
  • Understand how Electoral College works.
  • Examine how a candidate has to campaign in a few key states to win election.
  • Examine the fairness of the Electoral College on voters and candidates.
  • Identify the impact the Electoral College has on the election process.
Evaluation:
I plan on giving points based on a 4pt scale for student posts and each response using the following criteria:

4
The content is written clearly and concisely with a logical progression of ideas and supporting information. The post gives a clear sense of the strategy needed by the candidate to win.
3
The content is written with logical progression of ideas and supporting information, but lacks a concise strategy.
2
The content is vague in conveying a point of view or strategy.
1
The content lacks a clear strategy or logical sequence of information and is incomplete.

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